London MexFest !

 Ah London, diverse London, all the world is staged in your cultural spaces!

Soon, mid-August will be the time of Mexico, via the London MexFest, a celebration of Mexican films and culture, taking place at the lovely cinema Rich Mix in Shoreditch.

It last three days, from August 17th with the world première of Made in Mexico (Hecho en Mexico) by Duncan Bridgeman, followed by a concert from Amandititita the Mexican queen of Anarcumbia.

It is presented by the British Council, The Mexican National Council for Culture and the Arts (Conaculta) and the Mexican Film Institute (Imcine), the Morelia International Film Festival, Ambulante and CANANA.

Opening Night: Made in Mexico

Fri 17 August 7pm
£7, £5 student or concs (Booking soon)


Other highlights include:
  • Documentary films including award-winning The tiniest place (El lugar más pequeño), by Tatiana Huezo, which follows the struggle of five families to rebuild their lives in the middle of war and Draught (Cuates de Australia) by acclaimed director Everardo González,
  • Short films including Carlos Cuarón’s The Second Bakery Attack starring Kirsten Dunst and Elisa Miller’s Watching it rain, winner of the Palme D’Or at Cannes and two programmes of vibrant, short animations including the Best Animated Short at Morelia International Film Festival, Black Doll (Prita Noire),
  • Rare opportunity to view sci-fi classics from Mexico hardly screened before in the UK,
  • A series of talks with Mexican filmmakers,
  • The first ever UK exhibition of Lucha Libre photographs by Lourdes Grobet
  • and the first ever projection onto the Rich Mix facade by renowned artist Tupac Martir, titled ‘The Gentleman, The Mermaid, Mexican Cinema, Lottery!’



London MexFest is part of the Shoreditch Fringe Festival
Facebook www.facebook.com/LondonMexFest
Twitter www.twitter.com/londonmexfest

News from London, Kenya, DR Congo and more

Hello folks,

after a week of sun and summer in London, the Olympic Games have started and the cold and rain are back. Nevermind, the bad weather keeps us working hard.

Today on BBC World Service Africa, the main news are, according to me:

RDC: morts et blessés civils à Rutshuru

I interviewed today a team leader from Medecins Sans Frontieres who just spends weeks in Rutshuru:

Kenya: General Election date set for March 2013

The consesus was reached with four judges endorsing the March 4 2013 date which was ruled on by High Court in January...

One of the human rights group that had filed the petition for the elections to be held sooner said it was considering appealing the ruling:



And out of Africa:

India: Half of India left without power


Olympic news: Murray through!

"Andy Murray continued his quest for an Olympic singles medal by crushing Finland's Jarkko Nieminen to reach the third round at Wimbledon":


I support Team GB, Team Kenya and Team Somalia!


Book it for next Friday: Late at Tate Britain

Late at Tate Britain: Contesting Territory

Tate Britain
Friday 3 August 2012, 18.0022.00
"This Late at Tate Britain takes inspiration from Patrick Keiller’s commission, The Robinson Institute", indicates the website:


Expect an exciting evening of experimental music from Elaine Mitchener, Evan Parker, Mark Sanders and Steve Beresford. Plus DJing from Honest Jon’s Records’ Mark Ainley and a discussion led by theorist Mark Fisher (K-Punk) followed by a screening of Keiller’s film Robinson in Ruins.

Tate Britain will stay open until 22.00.

It will be possible explore the collection displays, and to see the Another London (photography) and Migrations exhibitions - or enjoy a drink at the pay bar!

More on Another London:

The city through the eyes of some of the biggest names in photography, including Bill Brandt, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank and many more...


More on Migrations:

This exhibition explores British art through the theme of migration from 1500 to the present day, reflecting the remit of Tate Britain Collection displays



See you there Londoners!


Tonight on BBC Afrique...

A la une de l'actualité de ce jeudi 26 juillet 2012 :

* Le président ivoirien Alassane Outtara est en France, il a rencontré son homologue Francois Hollande à l'Elysée.
* Au Mali, le président par interim, Dioncounda Traoré, prévoit de regagner vendredi Bamako.
Il a passé deux mois à Paris pour se faire soigner d'une attaque perpétrée par des manifestants hostiles.
Pendant ce temps, les representants du MNLA et de l'Azawad se sont reuni a Ouagadougou pour une mediation.
*Notre invite sera Moussa Ag Assarid, membre du Conseil de transition de l'Azawad, chargé de l'information et de la communication.
*Et le sport sera presenté par Emmanuel Coste.
Avant de developper ces titres, le résumé de l'actualite africaine et internationale sera présenté par Souleymane Issa Maiga a Dakar.

A tout à l'heure sur BBC Afrique:



What sun does to London!

     I got back in London on Sunday and for some various reasons I have to wander around the whole day before I can move in a place, where I am about to stay for a few weeks. 

I was afraid I would be exhausted, because I woke up at 6am to get my Eurostar train, but it was forgetting that it is always possible to transform a challenge into a source of great experience. 

First, there is an element of luck, the wonderful light and sun that is currently embracing the suffering rainy city I left a week ago. Then, thrilled by the luminosity, I decided to take it slow and sat at the station for a coffee and some fruit salad. Then, what usually never happens in London occurred, I started chatting with people around me. 

To my left sat a lovely family come to pick up their daughter coming back from France. She was a passionate traveller, just back from a few weeks spent in an internship at Montreux Jazz Festival. She studied French literature in the UK and is passionate about Simone de Beauvoir. She told me she expected to become a 'nomad' like me, and was currently a 'SDF', sans domicile fixe in French (=homeless), moving back and forth in between London and Paris... It rinds a bell!

On my right, in front of me, a lovely French lady who spent 28 years in the UK, mainly in Oxford, and is now settling back in Touraine, France. She told me about her years working for Oxfam, in and out of Africa, before she became a columnist for the New Internationalist. 

After an hour, it was time to get my luggage stored and explore the city. I headed to Covent Garden, one of my favourite London square and walk through the neighbouring streets up to Trafalgar Square to see how the heart of London was getting ready for the Games starting in less than a week! While the National Gallery is still full of visitors, the Square is already transformed into a giant music scene, and open only from a few gated entrances. Olympic staff distributes maps of London and flyers about the games from every side. 

After enjoying a bit of music and the funny busy atmosphere I decided to stop at Saint James's Park for an hour with a packed lunch, where I could enjoy the sun and wait for a friend on her way from North London to meet me. The whole of The Mall and Whitehall are now blocked because of the roadwork still going on until last minute before the Olympics, so I had to ask the way around to the City staff. I there met with a British Nigerian who explained to me I had to turn around until the Buckingham Palace entrance. He asked me where I was from I replied: Paris... But I work here in London and travel most of the time… Like I lived in Nairobi, Kenya, and goes regularly. He apparently liked it, told me about his trip to Kampala, Uganda, which I love too and he talked about the sunshine and women, stating how they could both be moody in England… It was time to go. I replied that I, despite the fact that I am a woman, was like an ever-bright sunlight, never moody, always smiley. I hope it will teach him about gender issues.

After a nice walk along Whitehall, passing by Downing Street – the British government’s headquarter for those who would not know – and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on King Charles Street, I was getting aware of the fact that living in London, I always neglect this famous area and rarely took a walk down between Westminster and Trafalgar Square… Well, mistake undone.

Unfortunately, I could not take pictures on my way, overburden with a few bags and without my camera. I arrived at Saint James’s Park where a melting pot of Londoners was seriously getting tanned: families with wannabe-skater teenagers, hip-hop fans, a lonesome pretty girl in short with her appreciated chihuahua, gay couples, etc. The sun was so intense I got tanned myself! My friend found me sitting on the grass, we gossiped for an hour, before heading to Piccadilly for a coffee.
Later on, by myself again, I decided that with the two other hours I had to ‘kill’, I wanted to see a bit of Camden Town. I took the bus from Leicester Square and ended up on Parkway, one of my favourite North London streets. I walked around and elected a café to sit and read and tweet. The place is called Yumchaa, is dedicated to loose leaf tea, but still served me a cappuccino, and has a lovely site on Parkway, with unmatched chairs – which I loved – and an amazing light coming from its glass rooftop.
Here is the only picture of that day:

And a link:
It was time to head back to Saint Pancras, but I had the pleasure to meet up with another friend on the way, a talented writer/filmmaker who was in town promoting a new project to English producers… What were the chances?
Despite a troubled route, a disrupted overground train and a slow bus, I ultimately reached my final destination, Stoke Newington, thankful after a unique beautiful London day!



African Music event in London!
It's next Tuesday, it's in Olympic-esque Stratford and it's Nigerian music!
Live at the Theatre Royal Stratford East


Tues 24 Jul 2012




Bez creates alternative soul, an understated and unusual hybrid of soul, rock, jazz and R&B that sets him apart from the mainstream Afro hip-pop movement.
A natural performer with a charismatic and playful stage presence, his songs of love, life and loss are modern gems that fit right beside the music of singers like John Mayer, Amy Winehouse, and John Legend.

Keziah Jones 

Blufunk is a fact! Committed artist and philosopher Keziah Jones blends funk, soul, blues, pop, rock and acoustic, with a particular touch of African style and sound, bossa nova and afro beat, creating a modern, multi-faceted and totally original musical style.

King Sunny Ade

King Sunny Ade, more affectionately known as KSA, is a musical phenomenon respected around the world. Having been a part-time percussionist at school, KSA joined the famous comedian, Moses Adejumo’s musical band in 1963.
KSA went onto establish his own group in 1967: Sunny Ade and his High Society Band. Success came quickly and most of his albums sold in excess of 500,000 copies. In 1983, KSA became the first Nigerian to be nominated for a Grammy Award. He has shared the stage with legendary artists including James Brown, Peter Tosh, The Police and Peter Gabriel.


Front stalls & dress circle: £30
All other seats: £25





Additional Information 

Running time: 3 hours
This is a seated event.
Nigeria House is adjacent to the Olympic Park. Please ensure that you travel to the venue by public transport. More information at www.getaheadofthegames.com
Please note the details of these events are subject to change. Keep checking the website for updates.



A taste of Japan... for a change

The wonderful Photographers' Gallery in London is hosting a very special exhibition dedicated to Japanese photography:



From 13 July to 9 September 2012, this exhibition transforms the Wolfson Gallery into a reading room featuring over 200 Japanese photobooks that are - according t the gallery 'virtually impossible to find in the West', all produced within the last ten years.

"A rich and varied book culture dominates production and distribution of photography in Japan, and this exhibition proposes that Japanese photography is best understood through its publications. These books are not easily categorised, as their content, format and design values are often unique. The exhibition encourages a non-hierarchical approach to different kinds of photographic work, and visitors are invited to come to the Gallery more than once to make their own journeys through this wealth of material".

 This exhibition is curated by photographer Jason Evans and Tokyo-based publisher Ivan Vartanian.

See more on the tumblr here:



The First Lines of Zadie Smith’s 'NW'

Good news in the literary world! The website The Millions has published the first paragraph of awaited new novel by British writer Zadie Smith, 'NW', to be released in September.

Here is the link:


And the text:

"The fat sun stalls by the phone masts. Anti-climb paint turns sulphurous on school gates and lampposts. In Willesden people go barefoot, the streets turn European, there is a mania for eating outside. She keeps to the shade. Redheaded. On the radio: I am the sole author of the dictionary that defines me. A good line—write it out on the back of a magazine. In a hammock, in the garden of a basement flat. Fenced in, on all sides".

Earlier this month, the site also published a small preview about the book among other expected novels:


Lots of links, I know, but one last: in June, Zadie Smith published a text on North West London (hence NW) in the New York Review of Books that is really worth a read according to me:




More on 'NW' bfrom its publisher, Peguin, here:



ICG publishes latest report on Mali: 'Mali - Avoiding Escalation'

Mali: Avoiding Escalation

Africa Report N°189 18 Jul 2012

In a little more than two months, Mali’s political regime has been demolished. An armed rebellion launched on 17 January 2012 expelled the army from the north while a coup deposed President Amadou Toumani Touré (ATT) on 22 March. These two episodes ushered Mali into an unprecedented crisis that also threatens regional political stability and security. An external armed intervention would nevertheless involve considerable risks. The international community must support dialogue between the armed and unarmed actors in the north and south to favour a political solution to the crisis. The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) must readjust its mediation efforts to avoid aggravating the already deep fault lines in Malian society. Strengthening the credibility of the transitional institutions to restore the state and the security forces is an absolute priority. Finally, coordinated regional security measures must be taken to prevent originally foreign groups from turning northern Mali into a new front in the war on terror.

Read ICG's recommendations:



The World in London @ Photographers' Gallery

The World in London

27 July - 12 August 2012

At least some good news comes with the London Olympic Games, the art events...
Let's not remain in the ambiant gloomy mood dur to traffic nightmarish news, Transport For London's misery, Theresa May's failure about security and let's enjoy the good mood that should come along with the long-awaited sport event!

Here is my first choice of activity matching exactly the Games' dates:

The exhibition at the London's Photographers' Gallery entitled the 'World in London'. 

"The World in London is an ambitious outdoor photography project for 2012, showing London's diversity and photography's unique role in capturing the human form", the gallery promises.

It is to be seen from July 27th, on a offsite in Victoria Park, London E3.

Over the past three years we have commissioned acclaimed and emerging British and international photographers to take portraits of Londoners of all ages and from all walks of life. Each portrait is unique in its composition, setting and style.

Coinciding with the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, this project set out to bring together 204 portraits of 204 Londoners, each originating from one of the competing nations.

The World in London celebrates London as a place where individuals from all parts of the world live side by side, each of them contributing to make London the unique city it is.

All photographs will feature on the project's website, launching on 27 July, which includes background stories on each of the participating Londoners.


Details here:


Kenya / UK: Historical trial opened

Thanks to The Independent, it is possible to follow the Mau Mau trial where three Kenyans are asking for compensation for the suffrance they went through during Kenya's independence fight in the 1960.

Here is the first of a series of articles published by Jerome Taylor in The Independent:

In a British court after 60 years – the elderly Kenyans asking for justice at last

Empire goes on trial over historical torture claims – with many more such cases to come


The Kenyan Human Rights Commission and Redress are the lead rights groups on this case.  


And this afternoon, the British government has accepted that "colonial forces in Kenya tortured and abused detainees during the Mau Mau rebellion", the High Court has heard.

Three elderly Kenyan men who are suing the government for damages were told it did not dispute that "terrible things" had happened to them. Their lawyers say it is the first ever official acknowledgement by the UK.

See on the BBC's website:

Mau Mau case: UK government accepts abuse took place


The hearing continues.

French (Muslim) Women forgotten?

An article I highly recommend about France and women issues, on the angle of discriminations towards Muslims and veiled women:

The French minister for women has let down Muslim voters

When Najat Vallaud-Belkacem became minister for women's rights in Hollande's cabinet, French Muslims had high hopes – sadly they have been disappointed

For the Guardian: 


Nabila Ramdani is a Paris-born freelance journalist and academic of Algerian descent, summarises the Guardian. She specialises in Anglo-French issues, Islamic affairs, and the Arab World. She was named a Young Global Leader 2012 by the World Economic Forum and was a winner of the inaugural European Muslim Woman of Influence Award in 2010. Her website can be found at http://nabilaramdani.com and you can follow her on twitter @NabilaRamdani

I have been discussiong about the issue, the hope Mrs Vallaud-Belkacem and French politics with Nabila Ramadani and other experts on Twitter. You can follow here if you want:




Africa Utopia !

Africa Utopia is a month-long festival of music, theatre, film, literature, dance, fashion, talks and debates programmed by Southbank Centre in conjunction with renowned Senegalese singer and human-rights campaigner Baaba Maal, as part of Southbank Centre’s Festival of the World with MasterCard.

Throughout the festival there are performances by iconic musicians who share Baaba Maal’s belief in the power of music for social change.

You can also hear from writers who provide insight into the reality of contemporary African culture. Meanwhile an invited group of young delegates – guided by ‘elders’ including Baaba Maal and Lemn Sissay – explore how art projects can be mobilized to bring about social change.Come along, join in and be part of this brand new festival!


Queen Elizabeth Hall
Wednesday 18 July 2012 - Thursday 19 July 2012
A genre-bending collaboration between banjo virtuoso and 18-time Grammy award winner Béla Fleck with Malian diva and Wassoulou singer Oumou Sangaré, here performing tracks from Fleck's 'Throw Down

The Clore Ballroom
Saturday 21 July 2012
The very best in Afrobeats comes to Southbank Centre for one night only. 

The Front Room at QEH
Saturday 21 July 2012
Sound and video artist Emeka Ogboh, visual artist Mary Evans and other distinguished artists and curators discuss contemporary African art and the global art market.



Africa Utopia explores where the continent can lead the world, including the role of music and theatre, sustainable technologies and the spirit of innovation and hope of the continent’s young people.
Senegalese singer and human rights champion Baaba Maal leads a council of elders of international musicians, artists, writers and activists in a three-week cultural summit, to show what Africa has to offer the world.
Taking the imagery of a traditional African village as a forum, 30 young people will be invited to discuss some of the world's pressing problems, using examples of groundbreaking projects in Africa to suggest solutions. The Royal Festival Hall will be at the heart of the village with a wide range of music, theatre, dance, talks and debates.
Baaba Maal is a Senegalese singer and guitarist born in Podor, on the Senegal River. In addition to acoustic guitar, he also plays percussion. He has released several albums, both for independent and major labels. In July 2003, he was made a UNDP Youth Emissary.
Africa Utopia is produced with support from Arts Council England. Part of the Southbank Centre’s Festival of the World.


Southbank Centre
Belvedere Road


'Half a Yellow Sun' - the movie

The acclaimed novel by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Half of A Yellow Sun is becoming a movie.

It is currently filmed in Nigeria, as this article shows in Arise Magazine:


It is adapted for screen by Nigerian theatre director, playwright and novelist Biyi Bandele.

The production stars Chiwetel Ejiofor, Thandie Newton and Genevieve Nnaji. It is filmed in Calabar, Nigeria. Filming ended on 23 June, according the Arise.

More details ont the story: Adichie´s bestselling story is set during the Nigerian-Biafran war during the 1960s. It then follows the lives of Olanna and Kainene, glamorous twin sister from a wealthy Nigerian family who must deal with a new reality amidst war.

So, it is the British-Zimbabwean actress Thandie Newton who has been chosen to take on the role of Olanna, one of the main character.

We can note that there's been a polemic about the choice of actress Thandie Newton to play the main character, an Igbo Nigerian woman facing war and hunger among other plagues. See for instance here:


I remember meeting Newton about 9 months ago, for the premiere in London of the brilliant documentary An African Election, by her actor friend Jarreth Metz. She was very happy to support this film reporting the 2006 Ghanean presidential election with brightness and talent. She was restless and very Hollywood... Mertz is Swiss Nigerian and grew up in Ghana. One of the interesting part of their discussion introducing the documentary was their shared experience of mixed origins between Europa and Africa, and the hassle of being a coloured actor in Hollywood, both being pretty good at relevently joking about it...

I guess we'll see about her performance once the film's out, let's give her a chance.

British-Nigerian Golden Globe nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor plays the role of revolutionary professor Odenigbo, with John Boyega as his 'houseboy' Ugwu.

The wonderful singer-songwriter Keziah Jones is also said to be involved in the production, creating original music for the soundtrack.

The film is set to be released in 2013.

A website is dedicated to the book, if you want to know more:



More here: 



Updates on DR Congo's conflict in North Kivu

This past few days I have been following along the team of journalists from BBC Afrique at the BBC World Service the latest event in Eastern Congo.

M23 rebels have started taking control over a few vilalges around Bunagana, neat Goma, the provincial capital of North Kivu.

Today in our main evening programme I interviewed the Congolese Ambassador Barnebe Kikaya bin-Karubi in Great Britain about the latest statement from the Congolese governement in Kinshasa. You can listen to the interview on our website in :

The interview is in French on our network, in English on Focus on Africa:


Barnebe Kikaya bin-Karubi accuses Rwanda of backing the rebels, who, according to him, are not defectors from the Congolese army (FARDC), but Rwanda milicians trying to destabilise Eastern Congo.

He also assures that stability has now return to North Kivu.

We'll have more reaction from DR Congo in the next few days. Stay tuned. 


See also from the BBC World Service:

BBC News - DR Congo: M23 rebels threaten to march on Goma:

In French, Q&A on the rebellion in DR Congo:


BBC Afrique

Hello all,

back at the BBC World Service's headquarter in Central London, I am currently presenting our news bulletins today on BBC Afrique. You can listen from our webpage here:


On the top right corner of the page are our audio links:

Nos principaux journaux

Our main headlines today: Egypt's Parliament, DRC rebels leaving Ruthsuru amd Mali security issue.

Stay tuned.


"Black Out"

Just discovered the trailer of this documentary film shot in Guinea: "Black Out"


Details from the producers:

Only about a fifth of Guinea's people have access to electricity. With few families able to afford generators, children have discovered the international airport, petrol stations and traffic roundabouts as unlikely places to revise. They are amongst the only places where they will always find light.

A literal and metaphorical journey towards enlightenment, "Black Out" shows the obstacles these children have to overcome to achieve their dreams in one of the world's poorest countries.

With the children's resourcefulness and determination acting as a metaphor for the country at large, the film asks whether Guinea can at last fulfill its potential and secure a better future for its people.

Directed by Eva Weber

Produced by Claire Neate-James & Kat Mansoor

A co-production between HSI London, Odd Girl Out Productions and Animal Monday in association with Britdoc, Puma, Chicken & Egg Pictures and Rooftop Films.

Hip Hop is Bigger Than the Occupation

I spent my Saturday between Hampstead, up North, and Ladbroke Grove, in the West side of London.

What a change!

I went from a pub with friends discussing about Israel and the US, where they had almost all recently travelled or are going to, to a local youth centre where another friend from London/Ghana/Nairobi was showing his documentary film about hip hop and resistance against occupation in Palestine.

This is London!


More about the documentary film:
Existence is Resistance Presents: 

Hip Hop is Bigger Than the Occupation

The film has been produced by the collective 'Existence is Resistance' and realised by my colleague from Vox Africa (among others of his activities!) Nana Dankwa.

It is about a musical tour in Palestinian territories where hip hop musicians and dancers were teaching resistance through the arts.

It features M1 of Dead Prez, Lowkey, Shadia Mansour, Marcel Cartier, Mazzi of S.O.U.L. Purpose, DJ Vega Benetton, SWYC, University of Hip Hop, Jody McIntyre and many more....

You can watch the trailer here:


It is a very moving and dynamic documentary following artists meeting Palestinians along their tour to promote peace and resistance. 

The film was shown in Lancaster Youth Centre on Saturday, after viewing in the US.

For more information on upcoming tours and about the organisation, you can check their website:
or email questions@existenceisresistance.org


From New Broadcasting House

My first week in New Broadcasting House has gone smoothly and excitingly. The whole of the BBC is supposed to move in the building in central London from June 2012 to January 2013, and this month it is the World Service's turn.

So here we are now all the African services together on the 5th floor of this brand new building, broadcasting to the whole of Africa for the radio programmes in English, French, Swahili, Hausa, Somali and Kirundi/Kinirwanda.

You can listen online:

For BBC Africa (English programmes):

For BBC Afrique (French service):

For the whole of the World Servcie:



For our updates online:


Check also our Facebook pages:

In French:

In English:


BBC Afrique also have a new daily online video news summary, produced from New Broadcasting House, you can watch here:



As for me, you can also follow me on Twitter for more African news, in English and French:




Hello folks.
This blog has now reached more viewers than my previous one from Nairobi and it's exciting to know people are getting interested in my travels, reports and African-European stories...

Now, I would love to know who are the readers of this little blog, especially in the USA, in Africa and in Asia. 
Please, let me know if you do!!

Cheers from London, UK.


Caine Prize for African Writing: Rotimi Babatunde wins 2012 award

Rotimi Babatunde wins 13th Caine Prize for African Writing

Rotimi Babatunde 
As the Prize announced yesterday evening, Nigeria’s Rotimi Babatunde has won the 2012 Caine Prize for African Writing, described as Africa’s leading literary award, for his short story entitled ‘Bombay's Republic’ from 'Mirabilia Review' Vol. 3.9 (Lagos, 2011).

Here is where to read the text:

The Chair of Judges, Bernardine Evaristo MBE, announced Rotimi Babatunde as the winner of the £10,000 prize at a dinner held on Monday, 2 July, at the Bodleian Library in Oxford.

Bernardine Evaristo said: “Bombay's Republic vividly describes the story of a Nigerian soldier fighting in the Burma campaign of World War Two. It is ambitious, darkly humorous and in soaring, scorching prose exposes the exploitative nature of the colonial project and the psychology of Independence.”

Another Night on Earth (London East End Film Festival)

It's summer and it's still raining, so what more to ask for than a film festival and foreign documentaries?
Nothing according to me. So I'll be seeing this Spaning film about Cairo on Sunday in East London:

East End Film Festival: On the Road to Downtown & Another Night on Earth (UK Premiere)

Decorative image
Sunday 8th July | 14:00 | tickets £8.50

It's at the Genesis Cinema:
93-95 Mile End Road, London E1
Tube: Bethnal Green (Central Line)

More on the film:

'Another Night on Earth'